Category Archives: Nordic classics

Launch of Nordisk Books and the publication of modern Danish classic Havoc in London

This Friday, 9. September, sees the launch of a new publishing house in London, Nordisk Books, and their first publication, Havoc by the great modernist Danish author Tom Kristensen. This is an exciting new venture that will bring past and contemporary quality Scandinavian literature to an English-speaking readership, and Havoc originally published in 1930 is an extraordinary novel with which to launch Nordisk Books.

Havoc by Nordisk Books

Karl Over Knausgård has said of  Havoc that it is “one of the best novels to ever come out of Scandinavia. As discomforting as beautiful, it portrays the fall of a man, and it’s so hypnotically written that you want to fall with him.”

If you wondered whether there was an original depressed, alcoholic, self-destructive fictional hero in Scandinavian literature before “the ulcer school” of Nordic Noir detectives, Tom Kristensen’s Ole Jastrau is the ultimate archetype.

If you are in London on Friday the 9th of September, why not join us for the launch party to celebrate Nordisk Books and to learn more about one of the greatest novels in modern Danish literature by the Danish James Joyce. Mikkel Bruun Zangenberg and myself will join the publisher Duncan Lewis in a talk about Havoc, Tom Kristensen and Danish literature in translation.

Date: Friday 9th September, 2016
Time: 19.00 – 22.00
Location: Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL (tube Holborn, bus no. 38)
After party: the Dolphin Tavern (just next door)
Debit/credit card payments will be accepted for purchase of books

Please RSVP to info@nordiskbooks.com

See also https://conwayhall.org.uk/event/nordisk-books-launch-party

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Kierkegaard, the Uncanny and Nordic Noir

Staaende_figurer_på_Langebro_lys

Unsettling Copenhagen in Philosophical writing and contemporary drama

5 May 2013 marks the bicentenary of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard’s birth. The aim of this symposium is to explore Kierkegaard’s writing on Copenhagen in relation to the theme of the uncanny. This will be done by superimposing the Copenhagen found in Kierkegaard’s writings with a contemporary and notoriously unsettling representation of this city: the TV-drama The Killing.

Join the PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM on 17 May, 2013, 10-5 PM. UCL, Pearson Building (North East Entrance) G22 LT (map)

The event is free but please register your participation here as seats are limited. For further information and the programme visit the website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scandinavian-studies/kierkegaard.

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Filed under Crime Research, Danish crime fiction, Nordic classics, Scandinavian crime fiction, Television drama, tv crime

Two events 11-12 May: Something Else for the Weekend

Hej! We have two events coming up, and Nordic Noir will loom large in both of them.

On Saturday 11 May, 2-3pm, enjoy a virtual tour of Crime Scenes and Cycle Paths: Copenhagen’s Hidden (Hi)stories. We’ve been working with UCL’s Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA) to make a multi-layered map of Copenhagen that reveals some sites, sights and stories you may not have witnessed in the literature and television of the city.  You can contribute to the map by telling us about your favourite places in Copenhagen. You can leave a comment below, or tweet @scandstudies using the hashtag #copenmap. Deadline: Wednesday 1 May! Tak!

On Sunday 12 May, 2-3pm, join us for a panel discussion on Welfare, Literature and the Body: Nordic Perspectives. Panelists include our very own Jakob Stougaard-Nielsen, Dominic Hinde (phd student, translator, journalist, Scottish green politico, and an editor of Post Mag), and others tbc. This panel discussion and Q&A explores the welfare state in the Nordic countries, focusing on how literary fiction has functioned as a space in which ideas about society, justice, welfare and well-being could be debated and developed. Of special interest is the human body: how have Scandinavian novels, poems, plays and even films represented the body – male or female, healthy or sick, infant or aging, working or playing – as  building, challenging, and benefiting from the welfare state? We’ll be using exciting new voting pod thingummies (that’s the technical term) to enable audience participation.

The venue for both events is the Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Roberts Building, Malet Place, London, WC1E 7JE [click here for a map and transport information]

Both events are free – no need to book, just come along! The first sixty attendees will be able to enjoy complimentary coffee and biscuits.SomethingElsefortheWeekend

These events are part of Something Else for the Weekend, 2 days of hands-on activities around the theme of Reading, giving festival-goers the chance to get up close and personal with UCL research. There are lots of fascinating exhibits and activities, from travel writing about toilets to learning difficulties to fairy tales, and it’s all free! For more information, please visit http://www.ucl.ac.uk/festival-of-the-arts/something-else-for-the-weekend

 

 

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Filed under Danish crime fiction, Nordic classics, Nordic lfestyle, Related events

Literature, justice and forgiveness

Nordic Noir discussions have often touched on the role of Scandinavian crime literature in dissecting concepts such as justice, catharsis, forgiveness, and other crucial issues for humanity. These lectures will not focus on crime fiction, but may be of interest for their focus on the power of literature to shape and reflect collective norms. All welcome – no need to book – please join us!

The venue for all four lectures is the Ramsey Lecture Theatre, Christopher Ingold Chemistry Building, 20 Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0AJ.

Four lectures by Leverhulme Visiting Professor Svend Erik Larsen

Leverhulme Lecture I: Wednesday 16 January, 6pm, G21 Christopher Ingold Building

Forgiveness after Religion: Radical Wrong-Doing & Cultural Norms

The idea of radical wrongdoing changed when Christianity lost its grip on cultural norms, and forgiveness acquired a new role in literature and culture. Followed by a wine reception hosted by the School of European Languages, Culture and Society.
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Leverhulme Lecture II: Wednesday 6 February, 6pm, G21 Christopher Ingold Building

Don Juan, Lear & Figaro: Reinventing Forgiveness

Tragedy and comedy feed on the transgression of norms and its consequences for human life. When they change, new visions of humanity emerge together with new role of forgiveness.
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Leverhulme Lecture III: Wednesday 13 March, 6pm, G21 Christopher Ingold Building

Where Forgiveness does not Exist

Cultures before or outside Christianity take issue with radical wrongdoing in other ways than the Western tradition, questioning the universal status of forgiveness.
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Leverhulme Lecture IV: Wednesday 24 April, 6pm, G21 Christopher Ingold Building

The Limits of Forgiveness: Writing Reconciliation in South Africa

Many South African writers have discussed the limits of the bold attempt to use forgiveness as an instrument to national reconciliation.
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Professor Svend Erik Larsen (Aarhus Universitet, Denmark) has been awarded a Leverhulme Visiting Professorship to spend January-June 2013 based at UCL Scandinavian Studies. He will be delivering four Leverhulme Lectures, leading Masterclasses for postgraduate students, and helping launch a new collaboration between UCL Scandinavian Studies, Dutch and SSEES: Learning from Small Nations. For more information, please contact Dr Claire Thomson (claire.thomson@ucl.ac.uk).

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Ibsen’s A Doll’s House at a special secret location…

Fans of Scandinavian drama may want to snap up tickets for a new version of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House – performed by [Foreign Affairs] at a special pop-up location in the West End. These will be the first performances of translator Paul Russell Garrett‘s fresh new English translation of this classic play. This is a very short run: 20-24 November only. There’s something very special about this theatre company – not to be missed! Click here for more information about the company and production or click straight through to buy tickets from WeGotTickets.

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