Category Archives: Crime Research

Scandinavian Crime Fiction – The Book

scancrimefiction-frontpageMy book, Scandinavian Crime Fiction, has now been published by Bloomsbury. On the Nordic Noir Book Club blog, you can find information about the book, learn about how the book came into being, read reviews and, not least, find out how to purchase a copy with a Book Club discount.

Click here to visit the Book page on the NNBC Blog

In other news, the Book Club is working on a new London event scheduled for late May featuring crime writers from Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Follow us on Facebook and on the blog to receive further news about the event and early access to tickets.

4 Comments

Filed under Crime Research, Scandinavian crime fiction

Who Reads the Literatures of Small Nations and Why?

What was the last book you read in English translation? What made you read it? Do you go out of your way to read books in translation? Are they easy to find? Can they tell us or show us things that English-language literature can’t?

You can help us to learn more about the habits of UK readers by answering this short and simple online questionnaire: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/translating-sen/reader-survey/. We are particularly interested in the thoughts of readers following our Nordic Noir Book Club

And join us for an evening of sharing experiences with the reading, publishing and selling of literature in translation in the UK on Wednesday February 4th 2015, 7pm; Elwin Room, Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution, 16 Queen Square, Bath BA1 2HNhttp://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/translating-sen/events/workshop-1-bath/

Leave a comment

Filed under Crime Research, European crime fiction, Related events

Kierkegaard, the Uncanny and Nordic Noir

Staaende_figurer_på_Langebro_lys

Unsettling Copenhagen in Philosophical writing and contemporary drama

5 May 2013 marks the bicentenary of the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard’s birth. The aim of this symposium is to explore Kierkegaard’s writing on Copenhagen in relation to the theme of the uncanny. This will be done by superimposing the Copenhagen found in Kierkegaard’s writings with a contemporary and notoriously unsettling representation of this city: the TV-drama The Killing.

Join the PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM on 17 May, 2013, 10-5 PM. UCL, Pearson Building (North East Entrance) G22 LT (map)

The event is free but please register your participation here as seats are limited. For further information and the programme visit the website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/scandinavian-studies/kierkegaard.

1 Comment

Filed under Crime Research, Danish crime fiction, Nordic classics, Scandinavian crime fiction, Television drama, tv crime

Conference: Crime Fiction 2013

Nordic Noir Book Club is considering sending a team of investigators to Leeds in September, will you be there?

Second call for papers:

The University of Leeds’ Faculty of Arts and the Crime Studies Network are pleased to invite you to the ‘Retold, Resold, Transformed: Crime Fiction in the Modern Era’ cross-disciplinary conference to take place at Leeds on the 17th and 18th of September 2013. See the conference website http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125158/crimefiction2013 for the conference abstract, speakers and call for papers.

In recent decades crime fiction has enjoyed a creative boom. Although, as Alison Young argues in her book Imagining Crime (1996), crime stories remain strongly identified with specific locations, the genre has acquired a global reach, illuminating different corners of the world – from the downtown precincts of Baltimore to the South African peninsula to bleak Danish skies – for the delectation of international audiences. The recent fashion for nordic noir has highlighted the process by which the crime story may be franchised, as it is transposed from one culture to another. Crime fiction has thus become a vehicle for cultural exchange in the broadest of senses; not only does it move with apparent ease from one country to the next, and in and out of different languages, but it is also reproduced through various cultural media. But what is involved in these processes of transference? Do stories lose or gain value? Or are they transformed into something else altogether? How does the crime story that originates in a specific society or culture come to articulate aspects of very different societies and cultures? And what are the repercussions of this cultural permeability?

Leave a comment

Filed under Crime Research

Retold, Resold, Transformed: Crime Fiction in the Modern Era

The University of Leeds’ Faculty of Arts and the Crime Studies Network are pleased to invite you to the ‘Retold, Resold, Transformed: Crime Fiction in the Modern Era’ cross-disciplinary conference to take place at Leeds on the 17th and 18th of September 2013.

See the conference website http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125158/crimefiction2013/1964/about/2 for the conference abstract, speakers and call for papers.

 

Kind Regards,

The Conference Organisers:

Dr Christiana Gregoriou, Prof. David Platten, and Dr Gigliola Sulis

Leave a comment

Filed under Crime Research